Climate Change Impact - Part 9 - Kyrgyzstan

Climate Change Impact


Part 9: Example –Kyrgyzstan


Summary

Kyrgyzstan has a continental climate with cold winters and hot summers. Most of the rain falls in the summer months and temperatures are below freezing for most of the winter months. It is projected that storm rainfall will increase by up to 20% and that the duration of lying snow will decrease.

Introduction

Kyrgyzstan is in central Asia and has severe winters with temperature below zero for many months, particularly in mountainous areas.



Figure 1 Map of Kyrgyzstan showing project road

Climate change can affect roads in many ways. The most obvious is storm rainfall; an increase in storm rainfall could require modification to current design for culverts and longitudinal drains. Other factors include daily temperature range, which could affect expansion joints, and maximum temperature, which could affect the choice of binding agent.

Once current values of these parameters have been determined then the extent to which they will change in the future can be assessed.

The observed climate data were downloaded from internet sites which process data facilitated by international organisations such as the World Meteorological Organisation.

Other documents related to climate change for Kyrgyzstan were downloaded. These included:

  •         UNFCCC Country Brief 2014: Kyrgyzstan
  •         Climate Profile of the Kyrgyz Republic
  •         The Kyrgyz Republic: Intended Nationally Determined Contribution
  •         The Kyrgyz Republic’s Second National Communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

These documents describe the potential change to the climate in general terms but were not specific enough for road design.

Current Climate

Kyrgyzstan has a continental climate with warm summer and cold winters.

 The following chart shows the location of the climate stations which were used to determine current climate parameters. Only stations in the area of the project road are shown. The data were at a daily time step and included: precipitation, depth of snow, average daily temperature, daily maximum temperature and daily minimum temperature. Data were downloaded for the period 1950 to the present.

Figure 2 - Location of sites with climate data


Figure 2 shows the location of sites with climate data. Sites with a solid diamond have precipitation, temperature and snow data. Sites with an open diamond only have precipitation data.

The chart also shows the area covered by the nearest climate model cell as an orange rectangle. It is convenient that the section of road of interest corresponds to one of the climate cells.

Rainfall is highest in the summer months. In winter, average monthly temperatures are often below zero. The road itself passes between two areas with higher elevations and maximum daily rainfall is lower than areas with higher land – around 20 mm per day.

Climate projections

To examine the performance of climate models, their simulation relative to past observed climate for the period 1970 to 1990 was examined. The four models chosen on this basis were:

  •         bcc-csm1-1: Beijing Climate Center Climate System Model (China)
  •         IPSL-CM5A-MR: The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (France)
  •         CCSM4: The Community Climate System Model Version 4 (USA)
  •         NorESM1-M: Norwegian Earth System Model (Norway)


The conclusions relating to climate change and daily maximum rainfall were:

  •   The average percentage increase for the final 50 years of the present century is 7.3% for the RCP 8.5 projections and 5.5% for the RCP 6.0 projections.
  • The projections of 5-day rainfall, more relevant for rivers which are crossed by the road showed a similar increase which could be translated in into increased flooding.
  • Winter and summer temperatures have been rising in recent years. The rate of increase has been 3.3 °C per century, slightly lower than the projected 5.5 °C per century. This significance of these increases relate to icing in winter and the heat-resistance of the road surface in summer. There is no indication that the diurnal temperature range (important for expansion joints) will increase.
  • On average, the depth of snow reaches 500 mm or even more in an average year.
·         When a range of models was ranked on the projected increase between the present and the year 2100, the difference in projection between the upper and lower quartile was quite modest; of the order of 15%. This applied for both RCP 6.0 and RCP 8.5.

·         When four selected models were compared their difference in projected values for the year 2100 was larger.

·         In most cases the largest percentage increase in daily rainfall for any projection occurred not in the final year of this century but in an earlier year. At any time in the current century the increase in precipitation rarely exceeded 20%, apart from the few models with the highest rate of increase in precipitation. A further consideration following from this is that the maximum increase in rainfall could occur during the projected life of the road.


There are no specific projections related to snow depth. Figure 3 shows two alternative metrics. The first is ‘icing days’; these are days when the daily maximum temperature is below zero. The second is ‘frost days’; these are days when the daily minimum temperature is below zero. The decline in these two variables indicates two things. Firstly, that snow fall will be less frequent and secondly that it will lie for a shorter time.


Figure 3 Days with temperature below freezing for all or part of a day

Conclusions

The main conclusions are that there will be an increase in storm rainfall of up to 20% during the life of the road. The period with lying snow will reduce.








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Climate Change Impact - Part 8 - Samoa

Climate Change Impact


Part 8: Example – Samoa


Summary

Some of the roads on Samoa had been damaged in recent storms and the objective of the project was to prepare the rehabilitation taking account of climate change. Climate data, including rainfall at a 10-inute time step for two stations were obtained. The data showed that there was a significant increase in rainfall with elevation (which might explain why the most severe damage to the roads was at highest elevations). A methodology was developed to estimate the storm intensity for a range of durations and return period taking account of climate change.

Introduction

Samoa consists of two main islands shown on the following map. Both islands have a road network. On Upolo there are roads around and across the island. On Savai’I the roads run around the island.
There is a third island, to the east of and smaller than these two, which is a US territory.


Figure 1 Map of Samoa

The main aim of the project was to upgrade some of the roads on the two Islands taking account of climate change. In particular one of the cross-island roads on Upolu had been damaged during a storm and it considered that its reconstruction should not suffer from the same problem.

As the roads around the islands are often close to sea level, the possibility of sea level rise also had to be considered.

Current climate

There are three types of data available in digital format:

  •         10-minute data from 2010 to 2015 for two stations, Nafanua and Afiamalu.
  •         Daily data from 1984 to 2014 for two stations, Faleolo and Apia.
  •         Monthly data from the early 1980s and in some cases earlier for four stations on Savai’i and one on Upolu.

These data were measured by the Samoa Meteorology Division (SAMET). Other data were abstracted from reports. Additional data on climate and flow were also obtained for US Samoa.

The weather of Samoa is influenced by four main factors:

  •         The sub-tropical high-pressure zone in the Eastern Pacific is a large semi-permanent anticyclone.
  •         Trade winds which blow from between east and south-east which contributes to a rain shadow effect to the north and west of the islands.
  •         The South Pacific Convergence Zone whose position helps to determine the seasonal pattern of the rain in which rain from November to March is above the monthly average.
  •         The Southern Oscillation which when in positive mode leads to increased rainfall.

The rain shadow effect is illustrated by Figure 2 which shows isohyets (contours) of the mean annual rainfall. Areas to the north and west of both of the main islands have less rain than areas to the south and east. The map also shows the effect of elevation on rainfall, with higher rainfall being associated with higher elevations.



Figure 2 Mean annual rainfall Samoa

Climate change projections

  1. The only daily record available for Samoa, of good quality and a long duration, is for Apia. This record was used to estimate the daily rainfall of a given frequency of occurrence.
  2. Two records of rainfall measured at 10-minute intervals are available for a period of up to 6-years, to the south of Apia. The rainfall stations are at different elevations and the one at the higher elevation records more rain than the other. However, when the rainfall at a short duration (from 10 minutes to a few hours) is expressed as a proportion of the daily value, the results are almost identical for both stations. Combining the two records, enables a single curve relating rainfall at a short duration to be calculated, as a proportion of the daily rainfall.
  3. The 10-minute rainfall records are at different elevations (796 m and 128 m) and have different daily storm rainfall (331 mm/day and 206 mm day). This implies that storm rainfall is higher at higher elevations. This is potentially an important conclusion but the 10-minute rainfall records are of short duration. These two records were combined with daily data from Apia, and charts and tables from earlier reports covering both islands, to arrive at a justifiable value for this effect.
  4. The data presented in some earlier reports implied that aspect is an important factor in storm rainfall, with storms on a south-facing slopes having twice the rainfall of slopes on the north or east. It was concluded that the limited data available do not allow an accurate value to be ascribed to this effect.
  5. The relationship between monthly and hourly rainfall was examined. The correlation for the two stations was weak at one station and non-existent at the other.
  6. Two methods are used to calculated the flow resulting from the storm rainfall: The Rational Method for small catchments and the Generalised Tropical Flood Model for larger catchments. These were complemented by the use of a hydrological model of American Samoa.
  7. Climate projections were based on 4 climate models: CSIRO, GFDL, HadGem and MIROC. These had been found to perform well in the region.
  8. Projections were provided for 3 time-horizons: 2030, 2055 and 2090.


 The 2055 projection this represents the highest intensities in this century. And was used for drainage design.
For daily values, this represents an increase of 17% on the current daily rainfall figure and for the standard deviation an increase of 7%. Both the daily values and the standard deviation are used to calculate the rainfall intensities for different frequencies of occurrence.
It was mentioned above that flow and climate data were used for a stream on US Samoa. This is very small catchment, 1.52 km2. (It is interesting to note that in another posting in this series that same model was able to successfully simulate flows in the Mekong River at a point where its drainage area was 660,000 km2.) The HYSIM rainfall/runoff model was run at an hourly time step, though the raingauge was outside the catchment. Figure 3 shows the simulated and observed daily flow.

Figure 3 Simulated and observed flow - Pago Stream - US Samoa

The rainfall and flow data were analysed to estimate an appropriate runoff coefficient. It was found that the coefficient increased for storms of higher return periods and was higher for 2-hour storms that 1-hour storms.
Sea level data were also analysed and it was found that in recent decades sea levels had been increasing by 5 mm a year. This is comparable with the projected values.








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Climate Change Impact - Part 7 - Vanuatu

Climate Change Impact


Part 7: Example – Vanuatu


Summary

The project examined projected changes to road flooding for four islands of the Vanuatu archipelago. The conclusion was that rainfall intensities would increase for all islands, particularly at the lower durations and return periods critical for road drainage.

Introduction

This example looks at the estimation of road flooding in Vanuatu. The islands of Vanuatu stretch from 13°S to 20°S and 116.e°E to 170.25°E. They lie about 2000 km from the coast of Australia.

The following chart shows the layout of the islands of Vanuatu. The four islands highlighted in green, Ambae, Pentecost, Malekula and Tanna, were included in the study. The red crosses mark the location of climate measurement sites. The roads on the islands are being upgraded and for this it was necessary to ensure that road drainage would be effective for the whole life of the road taking into account projected climate change.

Figure 1 Vanuatu showing the site of climate stations


Flooding on the islands can occur very suddenly and result in flash flooding with rapid increase in flow depth. The following photograph was taken the day following a storm.  The stream itself can been to the left of photograph. The highlighted area, near the tree, shows floating material trapped in the branches showing the depth of flooding. This indicates the degree of flood problems to tackled.


Figure 2 Material trapped in branches during a flood.


Current Climate

Daily observed climate data were obtained from 3 sources:
  •  The Vanuatu Meteorological and Geohazards Department (MGHD)
  •  The National Climate Data Center (NCDC) which is part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration in the USA
  • TuTiempo web site


Data from the Meteorological Office was for Bauerfield, Efate and three stations on Tanna. All stations had daily precipitation and Bauerfield included temperature and wind speed. Data from NCDC was for Pekoa, Spiritu Santo, for daily precipitation and temperature. The data from TuTiempo were available for 6 sites and included precipitation, temperature, wind speed and relative humidity.

Where data were available from different sources for overlapping periods, their values were compared and were found to be compatible.

Data were also obtained on storm rainfall profiles. For road drainage, the critical time of a storm is often of the order of a few minutes so daily data on its own is not sufficient.

Climate projections

Projections were provided from PACCSAP (Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning) and included precipitation projections in NetCDF (Network Common Data Format) for the whole world at the grid spacing of the original models. These are:

  •         ACCESS1-3, 1.875° longitude, 1.25° latitude (220km x 147km)
  •         CNRM-CM5, 1.4° longitude, 1.4° latitude (165km x 165 km)
  •         GISS-E2-R, 2.5° longitude, 2.0° latitude (294km x 235 km)


A further data set of projections was provided for which all the files had RX1Day in their title. They had been produced from the 50-km downscaling CCAM normal-cubic atmospheric model, a stretched-grid atmospheric model. They followed the guidelines of “Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI)”. These had projections of daily rainfall for three RCPs (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and for 4 time-horizons (2030, 2050, 2070 and 2090).

Downscaling was carried out using the Delta Method.

The baseline period was 1987 to 2013 which had observed data. For consistency, the 2030 projection was based on the same number of years, 2027 to 2043. The 2055 projections used values from 2042 to 2068.

The temperature projections were consistent with different models showing similar increases. For precipitation, the projections were less consistent with higher values of RCP leading to higher rainfall for some models and lower rainfall for others.

The conclusions for the four islands were:

  • Ambae: Rainfall intensity is likely to increase for 2030 by about 15% for the 1-in-2-year storm up to about 30% for higher return periods. The additional increase for 2055 relative to 2030 is about 4%.
  • Pentecost: As with Ambae, the percentage increase is less for small return periods, 20% for 1-in-2, but up to 32% for 1-in-100. The 2055 projection is almost identical to the 2030 projection.
  • Malekula: The projections suggest storm rainfall intensity will increase from the baseline to the 2030 time horizon but after that will remain more or less constant. It is also noticeable that increases in storm intensity for low return periods are small, 18%, but increase for longer return periods, about 33%. The 2055 projection is slightly lower than the 2030 projection.
  • Tanna: The projections for this island were lower than those for the other islands.




Figure 3 Daily rainfall intensity for different  islands and return periods

The above chart shows the daily rainfall intensity for different return period on each island for 2055.
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Climate Change Impact - Part 3 - Tonle Sap Lake - Cambodia

Climate Change Impact

Part 3: Example – Tonle Sap Lake - Cambodia


Summary

This study related to the estimation of vulnerability (as a function of ‘importance’ and ‘risk’) to climate change of roads and communities surrounding Tonle Sap lake.

A mathematical model of Tonle Sap lake and the channel linking it the River Mekong was developed. This model was able to accurately simulate the lake levels and hence the extent of flooding around the lake; this defined the ‘importance’. Another component of the study estimated the change in levels of the Mekong due to climate change; this identified the ‘risk’. The study drew on the simulation of the Mekong river described elsewhere.

The conclusion was that events which had a rare frequency of occurrence in the past would occur more frequently in the future.

Introduction

Tonle Sap is the largest lake in South-East Asia, is a wetland of international importance and is recognised by the Ramsar convention. Like most wetlands its area varies significantly through the year, from 2000 km2at its lowest to ten times that figure.  The bed of lake is close to sea level and its maximum level is normally only 10 m above sea level. The distance from the lake to the sea is more than 400 km. The channel from the lake to the Mekong can flow in either direction. When levels in the lake are higher than those in the Mekong water flows out of the lake toward the Mekong (generally from October to April) and for the rest of the year it flows in the opposite direction.

The following map shows three significant locations for level and/or flow measurement. Levels in the lake are recorded at Kampong Loung.  Flow and level in the River Mekong are measured at Kampong Cham and in the Tonle Sap channel are measured at Prek Kdem.

Figure 1- Cambodia and Tonle Sap

Figure 1 - Tonle Sap Lake and Cambodia

Current climate

The fluctuation of levels in Tonle Sap is very much influenced by levels in the Mekong. The levels in the Mekong vary by around 15 m and in the lake by around 7 m. The following chart shows daily water levels in the Mekong at Kampong Cham and in the lake at Kampong Loung. There is approximate synchronicity in the timing of the two sets of levels but with peaks in the Mekong generally being a bit earlier than those in Tonle Sap. This shows that levels in the lake are driven levels in the Mekong.

Figure 2 - Water levels in Tonle Sap Lake and the Mekong at Kampong Cham



A model was then developed which used the levels in the Mekong and the local inflow to the lake to simulated the levels in Tonle Sap.

The flow via the Tonle Sap channel was based on the following equation:

Flow = a * (Mekong level – Tonle Sap level – b)c

If the flows were toward to the lake then this formula was used as above. If it was toward the Mekong then it adjusted by a further factor d.

The values of the four parameters a, b, c and d were obtained by using the ‘Solver’ add-in of Excel. ‘Solver’ adjusts each of the four parameters to see how they change the accuracy of the model. In this case the accuracy of the model is defined as the sum of the squares of the errors in the estimation of the flows in Tonle Sap channel.

The outcome of Solver optimisation process is that the formula became:

Flow = 1126 * (Mekong level – Tonle Sap level – 3.97)1.18

The value of ‘d’, relating to the direction of flow, was 0.64. In reality, this parameter is compensating for some hydraulic factors not included in this model. A full solution of the equations would take account of the inertia of the water in the Tonle Sap channel; in simple terms when the relative levels in the lake and the Mekong change they first have to stop the river flowing in one direction before they can increase its flow in the opposite direction.

The value of parameter ‘b’, 3.97 m, which allows for the difference in the datum at Kampong Cham and at Prek Kdam is compatible with the figure of water levels above.

The following chart shows the simulated and observed water level in Tonle Sap.

Figure 3- Simulated and observed levels in Tonle Sap Lake


As can be seen the simulation is generally accurate. Many of the peaks of water level are slightly underestimated but otherwise it is good. The correlation coefficient between observed and simulated levels is 0.967.

It can therefore be concluded that the simulation of water levels in Tonle Sap Lake is sufficiently accurate for the model of lake levels to be used to study flooding around the lake.

Vulnerability

The aim of vulnerability mapping is to identify locations at risk where interventions to reduce vulnerability are needed. Two factors are involved. The first is the importance of the risk; if a road connects large communities, for example, it is more important that it continues to function and serve a wider community than a road with lower importance.

A simple definition of vulnerability is:

Vulnerability = Importance x Risk  …………………… Equation 1

Importance of road segments

To evaluate the importance of a road, a scoring system was developed.  The aim was to be able to identify the importance of a road. It is appreciated that such an ideal will never be completely achieved; whatever the algorithm says each would have to be examined using the calculated value as a guide. The scoring was applied to each road section, defined as a section of road between two junctions. In all there were 5263 road sections. They covered 8 provinces.

The Ministry of Rural Development of Cambodia (MRD) already has a system of road classification which goes from 1, the most important, to 4, the least important. As the aim was to have a higher weighting for higher importance this number system was reversed.

Another factor is what the road connects to. A road with a low ranking could be considered more important if it joined a road of higher rank.

The length of a road is also a factor – the longer the road the more important it could be considered. 
To have a scoring system compatible with the numbers associated with road category, the logarithm of the length in metres was used. This would go from 2 for a road of 100 metres up 4 for a road of 10,000 metres.

The population served by the road is also a significant factor. As the data on communes identifies the area and the coordinates of the centre, the algorithm identified communes based on the square root of the area (approximately the distance from the centre to an edge of the commune and distance from the road. To have a score compatible with other elements the logarithm of the population was used as a score. In this case the population was the total of all communes adjoining the road.

The data base also lists wats (pagodas), mosques and churches. Since wats are usually built on high ground and provide refuge during a flood the presence of a wat was given a score of 3.

Health centres, which are important to the whole community but not specifically relate to flooding were given a score of 2.

The final element was the presence of a school for which the score was 1.

The following table summarises the scoring system

Table 1 - Summary of road importance scoring
Item
Description
Score
Road segment identification
Coordinates and brief description
For cross-referencing only.
Road category
MRD categories from 1 to 4
Score in inverse order. Class 1 has 4 points, class 4 has 1 point.
Length
Kilometres
Logarithm of the road length in metres. For example, a segment 10,000 metres long world have a score of 4
Category of road joined to
e.g. National Road, MRD 3
As for road categories. If connected to a national road then 5 points. Points are given for both ends.
Population in communes adjoining road
This is the total population of all the communes the road passes through.
Score is based on the logarithm of the population. For example, if the population is 30,000 the score is 4.5
Schools
The presence or otherwise of a school
Score is 1 or 0
Wat/Church/Mosque
The presence or otherwise of a Wat (Pagoda)
Score is 3 or 0. Higher than a school as it relates to the whole community and often provides a refuge during a flood.
Clinic or health centre
The presence or otherwise of a clinic.
Score is 2 or 0. Higher than a school as it relates to the whole community.

The scoring system was applied to MRD roads in eight provinces: Battambong, Kampong Cham, Kampong Chhnang, Kampong Speu, Kampong Thom, Pursat,  Siem Reap         and Thboung_Khmom. Tis established the ‘importance’ element of equation 1.

Impact of climate change

The model of Tonle Sap, combined with modelling of flow in the Mekong under current project (climate change) values established the ‘risk’.
In general terms, the following summarise the projected changes in road vulnerability:
  •         What was a 1 in 5 year flood is projected to occur every 2 years.
  •         What was a 1 in 10 year flood is projected to occur every 3 years.
  •         What was a 1 in 25 year flood is projected to occur every 6 years.
  •         What was a 1 in 100 year flood is projected to occur every 9 years.
  •          A 1 in 100 year flood is projected to increase in area by 10%.


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